How can the middle class survive if their wages are not keeping pace with development costs of living?

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Health care, the credit card debt, mortgages, cars and food, nothing is affordable on a mehr.Once time a middle class family can afford to pay their bills without resorting to maps credit and / or loans. And only one person had the average family size was forty years arbeit.de U.S. becomes Mexico – composed of only rich and poor, with a middle class pesky endangered standards ist. Unser life is under fire, nobody does anything daf├╝r.Die rich, as they always have, do not worry about someone else’s economic misery. If they lose a bit of domestic customers for their products, they can always exportieren.Ist sentenced to the middle class into extinction? What will happen to the U.S. if we are away?

12 Comments
  1. Reply
    patois
    May 19, 2011 at 9:11 am

    Revolution comes to my mind.

  2. Reply
    basicporkandbeans
    May 19, 2011 at 9:33 am

    First, if they cannot support themselves they are by definition, poor not middle class. The question is, why are we defining all these people as poor? Or, your question is invalid on face.

  3. Reply
    Joe Flare
    May 19, 2011 at 9:49 am

    hey lets just be thankful were not the lower class their living in hell right now!

  4. Reply
    HLBellevino
    May 19, 2011 at 10:39 am

    The very poor & the very rich…thats the future. We are on the endangered list.

  5. Reply
    CRAIG C
    May 19, 2011 at 11:38 am

    I have said this for the last two years. There will be no middle class within the next ten years. Either you’ll be rich or poor. You can thank President Bush and his pals that he made millions for, for doing this.

  6. Reply
    djanimaequeen
    May 19, 2011 at 12:25 pm

    Excellent question. I think you hinted at the answer. We’ll end up like Mexico.
    Edit: NC and brk – Wow! That’s a damn good answer!

  7. Reply
    SadWoman
    May 19, 2011 at 1:15 pm

    The standard of living for many if not most Americans will definitely decrease in the upcoming decades (i.e. peak oil, peak water, peak coal, possible economic depression, hyperinflation, continuing resource wars in the Middle East). We are truly living at the end of an era, and the middle class will be one of the first casualities.

  8. Reply
    Phil H
    May 19, 2011 at 1:28 pm

    well what can we do? raising wages will just raise the cost of living anymore. i think we’ll do fine, just go to college and get a good job.

  9. Reply
    brk
    May 19, 2011 at 1:57 pm

    only if we help contribute to it is it going to be this way. If we continue to procreate with no regard to the future then that is exactly what will happen along with exhausting all natural resources including water and oil. if it goes like that then middle class is really going to be the last thing on your mind. everyone should really think about only having the amount of children that they can continue to support for longer than 18 years. otherwise they really will be raising people to exist only in poor class since the cost of living continues to rise. the other thing is that all the people buying houses for more are driving up the home prices. lastly, do you really think the economy that has brought us to today is really going to keep us on top. all world powers have collapsed in history, why would we be different.

  10. Reply
    dvwrg
    May 19, 2011 at 2:41 pm

    Welcome Middle Class to the poor class neighborhood
    I’m sure more will be joining us in the near future.
    Maybe when enough of them join us maybe we can do something about this.

  11. Reply
    NC
    May 19, 2011 at 2:43 pm

    Historically, the wealth concentration in the U.S. has been inversely related to inflation and the strength of the unions. Inflation in the U.S. has been steadily declining since mid-1980s, while unions have been losing their power. Both trends are about to reverse; increasing budget deficit will push inflation up, while unions are actively branching out into new industries.

    Right now, the wealth concentration in the U.S. is right where is was during the Gilded Age. And we all know what happened after the Gilded Age: The New Deal. Expect history to repeat itself; eventually, the next New Deal will be put in place by the next wave of populist politicians…

  12. Reply
    Robert David M
    May 19, 2011 at 3:19 pm

    The Constitution was altered from securing rights to each citizen adult individual in1902. The change was to public-interest fantasizing, conducted by benevolent government tsars elected by their victims. the middle class began to die as a group that day; the process was completed in 1994, when he constitution was finished.

    Your figures are correct. My father as a postal worker
    on a salary in 1941 of $ 4.000 was able to support a wife, 2 children, own a modern-day $ 300,000 house, a new equivalent to a $ 30,000 car, take vacations and own half an acre of land. To own what he did today, he would have to earn $ 104,000 a year–but even his partially-protected government job now pays only $ 28,000. That’s a loss of purchasing power of over 75% during that time–and the
    similar loss for those NOT government connected has been much worse.

    Only the floating of credit card debt has kept people from realizing the 3 truths of the economy:
    1. It is totalitarian–money does not exist, only collectives–some holding power over others, others in power over you.
    2. 85% of the nation’s wealth has been arrogated by monopolists alloowed to function so by the government–in financial organzations, media, departments, unions, educational institutios and the military etc.
    3. Only credit cards have stopped US citizens from realizing how bad their plight is: no retirement possibe, no safety from health care costs, no marketplaces of categorically defined products, jobs and job competitions,
    no protection through government, no meaningful elections, no real arts, no real monetary system, no education in scientific prioritized inner-workings definitions that means anything, and no lives worth the having.

    Your questions asks for a “bottom line”–the US can go on in some fashion for another 500 years. But it will be effectively dead of its own deregulational totalitarianism long before that date in the early 2530s is reached, a victim of the betrayal of its republic’s constitution.

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